A.I Gallery

Herman Rahman | The Guardian

'Brooklyn gangs and a glimpse behind North Korea’s closed regime are just two of the highlights of this year’s Photo London festival.'

Photo London is at Somerset House London, 16-19 May 2019

We Travelled in Moonlight, 2018

From the series Han, by Herman Rahman, which traces the history of North Korea, relying largely on archival imagery and found text

Photograph: © The artist, courtesy A.I. Gallery/Herman Rahman

Read full article here.

Haffendi Anuar | Beers London

Haffendi Anuar & Nadia Waheed: For The Few And The Many

“For the Few and the Many, presents the paintings of Pakistani-born, Saudi-American artist Nadia Waheed with a sculptural presentation by Malaysian sculptor Haffendi Anuar.

Saudi-born, Pakistani-American artist Nadia Waheed has lived in places such as Islamabad, Paris, Sydney, Cairo, and the USA. In fact, she hasn’t lived in the same place for longer than four years. As such, the notion of displacement, vulnerability and identity has undoubtedly woven itself into her paintings. She states that the figures in her paintings are herself - but also others: "The women are [versions of] me, but also others. They’re two women, but also one woman...women contain multitudes", she states. 

In a similar vein the works of Malaysian sculptor Haffendi Anuar speak to a similar notion of identity in flux - although his concern is less about the 'self' and more about the external environment. Like Waheed, Anuar has lived in London, Rhode Island, and China, and this desire to comprehend one's place in the world has - for Anuar - manifested in the form of the piloti. Pilotis are structural columns made to lift a building from the ground, and/or above water. As such, they function duplicitously: by both providing the connection to a foundation but also by offering a detachment from said foundation. In the same instance, both artists are talking about singularity - and multiplicity. “

Read full press release here

18 May 2019 – 22 Jun 2019

Opening Times:

Tues-Fri: 10-6
Sat: 11-5

Sarah Choo Jing | The Unsettled Dust Asian Short Film Festival

The permutable phenomenon of the everyday life is usually inherited from the natives of the contemporary past as they attempted to change their “current” situation for a better future. While encompassing many contradictions and conflicts through its evolution, there is also the flexibility and space for one to seek out a lifestyle that conforms to his/her needs, be it as an individual or as a community. The emergence of the everyday life can therefore be viewed as a kind of landscape – a spectacle that evokes contemplation. Shifting the focus to the contemporary life in Asia, it is apparent that the landscape of the everyday life has been shaped by modernisation, capitalism and postmodernism as a response to globalisation, and at the same time, it also reflects the regional living gestures brought about by anti-globalisation.

The festival will feature short films that narrate first-person accounts of various personal, regional and cultural phenomena occurring within Asian life, while presenting the social mentality that has been engendered by globalisation and rapid economic development. By portraying different fragments of the social landscape brought about by the inevitable aforementioned issues, a variety of observations such as cultural shifts, localisation and segregation of social classes, can be made. Consequently, the festival attempts to seek out the possibilities of a varied regional dialogue exchange, which might offer a more intimate and comprehensive experience of the Asian perspective. Paramount to the festival’s content lies the numerous simplified interpretations and representations that bring to the fore the daily lives of commoners under the influence of globalisation and westernisation, offering a unique spectacle that is distinct from Orientalism.

Read more about the festival here

The Asian Short Film Festival held at the VT Artsalon, Taipei; curated by Nien-Ting Chen & Jaxton Su.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | Royal College of Art Lecture

Women Artists and a Brave New Art World

  • The 2009 Venice Biennale edition featured 43% women; in 2013, it dropped to 26%. In 2015, it was 33%, and in 2017 was 35%.  No major international exhibition of contemporary art has achieved gender parity. (ARTnewsArtsy)  

  • Women working across arts professions make almost $20,000 less per year than men. (Artsy)

  • Women in the arts are found not to experience the “motherhood penalty” which in other industries results in a loss or stagnant income after children. But men in the arts do experience the “marriage premium,”—an increase in pay for married men of roughly $7,200 per year that neither women nor single men experience. Men working in the arts also receive an income bump when they become fathers. (Artsy)

  • ArtReview’s 2018 Power 100 list of the “most influential people in the contemporary art world” was 40% women—though this is an improvement from 2017 (38%) and 2016 (32%). (Art Review)


XING is a collective of artists. It was founded by Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee in 2017 and exists as a domain of possibilities shedding light on the trailblazing lives of East and Southeast Asian women today. XING champions the vagabonds, challenges hegemony, and celebrates a oneness through image and prose. The inaugural volume of XING (2017) explores the current landscape of women in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. An introductory text is written by Clara Lee. The photo series & publication has been featured in Dazed, Riposte, i-D Magazine amongst others.