A.I Gallery

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | UNSEEN Magazine Issue 7

The Ghosts Amongst Us

Karin Bareman on the Contemporary responses to our colonial legacies.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee,  Inconspicuous spray of blossoms, We've got the sun under our skin , 64cm x 80cm, 2018, Ed 3 + 1AP

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee, Inconspicuous spray of blossoms, We've got the sun under our skin, 64cm x 80cm, 2018, Ed 3 + 1AP


Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee—A.I.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee is an artist based between London and Singapore. Her work navigates the nuances and intricacies that arise out of history and memory. Meditating on fractured and lost traditions, themes of displacement and nostalgia weave in and out of her storytelling. Through visual and textual interventions, she attempts an undoing of power structures and knowledge production. By negotiating the dynamic of the ‘near’ and ‘elsewhere’, her practice works to remap a singular history, steering narratives toward alternate and fluid territories.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | UNSEEN Platform Premiere

UNSEEN Platform Interview with Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee


Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee—A.I.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee is an artist based between London and Singapore. Her work navigates the nuances and intricacies that arise out of history and memory. Meditating on fractured and lost traditions, themes of displacement and nostalgia weave in and out of her storytelling. Through visual and textual interventions, she attempts an undoing of power structures and knowledge production. By negotiating the dynamic of the ‘near’ and ‘elsewhere’, her practice works to remap a singular history, steering narratives toward alternate and fluid territories.

XING | UNSEEN Platform Stories by Jade Barget

UNSEEN Platform Stories by Jade Barget


XING—A.I.

Alternative narratives are a running theme at this year’s festival, and XING is no different. Founded by Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee, XING is an online collective seeking to represent the lives of East and Southeast Asian women today. Lee established XING in order to combat societal misconceptions surrounding Asian women, specifically looking to challenge notions of fetisiation. The photography is striking—a blend of humour, eroticism and care. As XING say themselves, “We champion the vagabonds, challenge hegemony, and celebrate a oneness through imagery and prose.” 

Shop XING Photobook Here

Haffendi Anuar | Thames and Hudson '100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow'

‘Kurt Beers, founder and director of BEERS London gallery, discusses his new book '100 Sculptors of Tomorrow' that celebrates and sculpture and opens up the definition of the medium.’

News page Haffendi.jpeg

What were some of the surprising things you found when compiling this book?
A lot of found-object art, firstly. A lot of people working in very conscientious, heavily scientific methods that at times would simply boggle my mind. Rachel Ara, Kader Attia, Rachael Champion, Haroon Mirza, Euyoung Hong, or Olaniyi Akindiya… these aren’t artists with ‘technologically’ or complex machinic ideas but rather dense, complex historicities surrounding their work and ethos, that at times proved very difficult to … whittle down, shall we say, into palatable entries. The problem is how to accurately paraphrase what they are doing in a brief write up is very challenging. You don’t ever want to include an artist and then do them a disservice by under-explaining their thought processes. Further, geography plays a large part: I don’t think its surprising that many artists from more ‘privileged’ countries talk about materiality, whereas like Rushdi Anwar (Kurdistan/Iraq), Catalin Badaru (Romania), Haffendi Anuar (Malaysia), Saad Qureshi (Pakistan), Tuan Andrew Nguyen (Vietnam), Beili Liu (China), Serge Attukwei Clottey (Ghana), are concerned with contentious, polemic political ideas and powerful statements. I also found that I ended up loving some things I originally thought I didn’t like. Knowledge is a powerful thing, and suddenly you get an understanding of what this artist is actually talking about, and I would respond differently to it. I think sculpture is a slower burn that painting. A harder sell, but incredibly powerful medium. Virginia Leonard is one powerful example…her work is so poignant and personal… But you’ll have to pick up the book to read about her journey.

Full Interview Here


HAFFENDI ANUAR (b. 1985, Malaysia) is a multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, paintings, installations and drawings. Mining art history, technology, nature and regional contexts Anuar creates object-based works that recycle found images and artistic styles from digital and local sources.

His work traces the contemporary mutations that occur in cultural symbols as a result of displacement, digitalisation and commodification. Through the inflated velocity of its digital dispersion and the pixelation of traditional designs and patterns, the resulting object becomes a pseudo-artefact. Its existence is inspired by kitsch decorative pieces and cultural debris, questioning their potential to enter Western economic exchange markets.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | UNSEEN Living Room

A.i. Gallery | EGL| Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee, Palpable and enslaving .jpg

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee will be taking part in the panel Globalised Aesthetics - Fluidity of images moderated by Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger (Professor of Exhibition Studies and Spatiality at University of the Arts, Helsinki) on Saturday 21 Sep 12.00-13.00.

LagosPhoto presents Globalised Aesthetics - Fluidity of images.
In the digital world conversing and corresponding aesthetics allow images to become mobile irrespective of their heritage. In this conversation, the panel questions if the art market truly embraces various tonalities, if aesthetics intersect effortlessly as it did before the internet, and if photographers can resist fashion and trends in order to work intrinsically.

Please read more about talks here.


Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee—A.I.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee is an artist based between London and Singapore. Her work navigates the nuances and intricacies that arise out of history and memory. Meditating on fractured and lost traditions, themes of displacement and nostalgia weave in and out of her storytelling. Through visual and textual interventions, she attempts an undoing of power structures and knowledge production. By negotiating the dynamic of the ‘near’ and ‘elsewhere’, her practice works to remap a singular history, steering narratives toward alternate and fluid territories.

Haffendi Anuar | Star 2

Haffendi Anuar recognised as one of the world’s exciting sculptors in ‘100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow’ book. By Rowen Lin

Haffendi’s  Machines For Modern Living,  a commissioned outdoor sculptural work for the Battersea Power Station development in London in 2017. Photo: Filepic

Haffendi’s Machines For Modern Living, a commissioned outdoor sculptural work for the Battersea Power Station development in London in 2017. Photo: Filepic

Haffendi Anuar continues to put Malaysia on the map with his artworks. The Kuala Lumpur-based contemporary artist is featured as one of the world’s exciting young sculptors in the book 100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow, written by Kurt Beers, the director of London-based Beers gallery.

The book, published by London-based company Thames & Hudson and released on Sept 5, is a culmination of a year-long search to identify the 100 emerging sculptors working around the world today.

Beers’ 100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow serves not only as an inventory of notable sculptors, but also questions what the very nature of sculpture can be.

“I am very excited to be part of the book, very happy when I received the news and thankful for the recognition. It is good to be recognised by an international publication as being based in KL, far away from the obvious art centres, any kind of visibility is appreciated,” says the 34-year-old artist.

His first solo exhibition M13 was held at Richard Koh Fine Art in KL, before subsequent solo outings in Taipei, New York and Singapore.

His group shows this year include For the Few And The Many at the Beers London gallery in London and the Bakat Muda Sezaman 2019 (Young Contemporaries 2019) show at KL’s National Art Gallery. He has previously exhibited in group shows in London, Paris, New York, Shanghai, Singapore, Venice and Basel (Switzerland).

Haffendi, a graduate from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, was also commissioned to create an outdoor sculpture for the Battersea Power Station development in London in 2017.

The 100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow book, published by Thames & Hudson, is an internationally juried selection of emerging and undiscovered sculptors working today.

The selection of 100 artists in this book is a combination of online open-call submissions and juror recommendation, including sculptors found by Beers at art fairs and on Instagram. The final selection features artists working in 38 different countries, from a diverse range of backgrounds, styles and mediums.

“It is not just about creating something for a plinth, but about questioning and reshaping sculpture as a discipline, and rethinking precisely what we – as viewers – have come to expect a sculptor to make. Sculptors offers us something tangible, physical and material – a way, perhaps, of figuring out how to situate ourselves in a greater context,” notes Beers in the 288-page publication.

In a recent online interview, Beers was quoted as saying that sculptors such as Haffendi, Rushdi Anwar (Kurdistan/Iraq), Catalin Badaru (Romania), Saad Qureshi (Pakistan), Tuan Andrew Nguyen (Vietnam), Beili Liu (China) and Serge Attukwei Clottey (Ghana) are concerned with contentious, polemic political ideas and powerful statements rather than ‘materiality’, which many artists from more “privileged” countries talk about.

Haffendi’s love of art can be traced back to a young age. He has come a long way from making “sea urchins” from satay sticks.

He is certainly no stranger to form, material and object-based works, sharing that although he has a soft spot for beautiful paintings and images, he has enjoyed creating objects since his days of making models for a local architecture firm.

“In terms of making sculptures or object-based works, I do feel a lot more comfortable thinking materially and through forms. There was never a point where I wanted to focus on sculptures, I just wanted to work honestly through a language that I was most comfortable with and that is dealing with materials,” he says.

In his more recent works, Haffendi has been incorporating found and ready-made materials such as ropes, fabric and fibres into sculptural forms.

“I am thinking in terms of ‘softening’ the contours of the forms, as well as the pedestals that cradle the sculptures. This gesture also ties the sculpted forms to the everyday realm, linking the handmade to the mass-produced world of made-in-China products. Also, I am recontextualising new works in relation to sub-cultures, urban spaces and the human body,” he says.

Noting that the art scene in KL is very much painting-dominated, Haffendi stresses the need for aspiring sculptors to believe in what they are doing, despite the obvious challenges.

“Have an open mind when making sculptures, be playful and experimental when layering materials, forms and ideas, and don’t limit yourself to preconceived notions of what sculptures should be or represent,” he says.

Next month, Haffendi will be pursuing his Masters in Fine Art in England, and is looking forward to making new works in a new environment.

100 Sculptors Of Tomorrow is the second book in a Thames & Hudson series authored by Beers. It includes images of each artist’s work, short texts and biographical info, recommended reading, quotations and a further listing of artists to watch.

Back in 2014, Beers authored the 100 Painters Of Tomorrow book.

Read more


HAFFENDI ANUAR (b. 1985, Malaysia) is a multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, paintings, installations and drawings. Mining art history, technology, nature and regional contexts Anuar creates object-based works that recycle found images and artistic styles from digital and local sources.

His work traces the contemporary mutations that occur in cultural symbols as a result of displacement, digitalisation and commodification. Through the inflated velocity of its digital dispersion and the pixelation of traditional designs and patterns, the resulting object becomes a pseudo-artefact. Its existence is inspired by kitsch decorative pieces and cultural debris, questioning their potential to enter Western economic exchange markets.

Herman Rahman | The Guardian

'Brooklyn gangs and a glimpse behind North Korea’s closed regime are just two of the highlights of this year’s Photo London festival.'

Photo London is at Somerset House London, 16-19 May 2019

We Travelled in Moonlight, 2018

From the series Han, by Herman Rahman, which traces the history of North Korea, relying largely on archival imagery and found text

Photograph: © The artist, courtesy A.I. Gallery/Herman Rahman

Read full article here.

Haffendi Anuar | Beers London

Haffendi Anuar & Nadia Waheed: For The Few And The Many

“For the Few and the Many, presents the paintings of Pakistani-born, Saudi-American artist Nadia Waheed with a sculptural presentation by Malaysian sculptor Haffendi Anuar.

Saudi-born, Pakistani-American artist Nadia Waheed has lived in places such as Islamabad, Paris, Sydney, Cairo, and the USA. In fact, she hasn’t lived in the same place for longer than four years. As such, the notion of displacement, vulnerability and identity has undoubtedly woven itself into her paintings. She states that the figures in her paintings are herself - but also others: "The women are [versions of] me, but also others. They’re two women, but also one woman...women contain multitudes", she states. 

In a similar vein the works of Malaysian sculptor Haffendi Anuar speak to a similar notion of identity in flux - although his concern is less about the 'self' and more about the external environment. Like Waheed, Anuar has lived in London, Rhode Island, and China, and this desire to comprehend one's place in the world has - for Anuar - manifested in the form of the piloti. Pilotis are structural columns made to lift a building from the ground, and/or above water. As such, they function duplicitously: by both providing the connection to a foundation but also by offering a detachment from said foundation. In the same instance, both artists are talking about singularity - and multiplicity. “

Read full press release here

18 May 2019 – 22 Jun 2019

Opening Times:

Tues-Fri: 10-6
Sat: 11-5

Sarah Choo Jing | The Unsettled Dust Asian Short Film Festival

The permutable phenomenon of the everyday life is usually inherited from the natives of the contemporary past as they attempted to change their “current” situation for a better future. While encompassing many contradictions and conflicts through its evolution, there is also the flexibility and space for one to seek out a lifestyle that conforms to his/her needs, be it as an individual or as a community. The emergence of the everyday life can therefore be viewed as a kind of landscape – a spectacle that evokes contemplation. Shifting the focus to the contemporary life in Asia, it is apparent that the landscape of the everyday life has been shaped by modernisation, capitalism and postmodernism as a response to globalisation, and at the same time, it also reflects the regional living gestures brought about by anti-globalisation.

The festival will feature short films that narrate first-person accounts of various personal, regional and cultural phenomena occurring within Asian life, while presenting the social mentality that has been engendered by globalisation and rapid economic development. By portraying different fragments of the social landscape brought about by the inevitable aforementioned issues, a variety of observations such as cultural shifts, localisation and segregation of social classes, can be made. Consequently, the festival attempts to seek out the possibilities of a varied regional dialogue exchange, which might offer a more intimate and comprehensive experience of the Asian perspective. Paramount to the festival’s content lies the numerous simplified interpretations and representations that bring to the fore the daily lives of commoners under the influence of globalisation and westernisation, offering a unique spectacle that is distinct from Orientalism.

Read more about the festival here

The Asian Short Film Festival held at the VT Artsalon, Taipei; curated by Nien-Ting Chen & Jaxton Su.

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | The Telegraph

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee
Lotus Leaf, 2019
Series: Vessels
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#elizabethgabriellelee
#eglland #photography #photolondonfair19 #memory #identity #belonging

“[Our list features] many galleries opened by young women, bringing work by not-yet established women photographers and artists,” says Farshad. “And that’s one of our greatest achievements, creating platforms for London spaces like Roman Road gallery, Sid Motion Gallery, AI Gallery showing Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee and Galerie Miranda in Paris … We’re really excited about the future, which is so fluid and developing so fast. We’re very conscious of needing to support minorities, to open up platforms for diversity.”

Read More Here

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee | Royal College of Art Lecture

Women Artists and a Brave New Art World

  • The 2009 Venice Biennale edition featured 43% women; in 2013, it dropped to 26%. In 2015, it was 33%, and in 2017 was 35%.  No major international exhibition of contemporary art has achieved gender parity. (ARTnewsArtsy)  

  • Women working across arts professions make almost $20,000 less per year than men. (Artsy)

  • Women in the arts are found not to experience the “motherhood penalty” which in other industries results in a loss or stagnant income after children. But men in the arts do experience the “marriage premium,”—an increase in pay for married men of roughly $7,200 per year that neither women nor single men experience. Men working in the arts also receive an income bump when they become fathers. (Artsy)

  • ArtReview’s 2018 Power 100 list of the “most influential people in the contemporary art world” was 40% women—though this is an improvement from 2017 (38%) and 2016 (32%). (Art Review)


XING is a collective of artists. It was founded by Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee in 2017 and exists as a domain of possibilities shedding light on the trailblazing lives of East and Southeast Asian women today. XING champions the vagabonds, challenges hegemony, and celebrates a oneness through image and prose. The inaugural volume of XING (2017) explores the current landscape of women in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. An introductory text is written by Clara Lee. The photo series & publication has been featured in Dazed, Riposte, i-D Magazine amongst others.